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Apache Trout Oncorhynchus apache

 

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Apache Trout
credit: John Rinne

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Alternate name: Arizona Trout

Family: Salmonidae, Trouts view all from this family



Description The Apache trout measures in length from 6 to 24 inches (61 cm), and weighs between 6 ounces and 6 pounds (2.7 kg). It rarely exceeds 25 cm, but can reach up to 40 cm in its native, headwater streams. The world record Apache trout measured 60.96 cm (24 in) and was caught in Hurricane Lake in 1993. Apache trout are a yellowish-gold color with a golden belly and have medium-sized dark spots that are evenly spaced and that may extend below the lateral line and onto the dorsal and tail fins. The top of its head and back are dark olive in color, and it has the appearance of having a black stripe/mask through each of its eyes, due to two small black dots on either side of the pupil. There is a cutthroat mark below the lower jaw, ranging in color from yellow to gold.

The Apache trout is the state fish of Arizona, and is one of only two species of trout native to that state, with the other being the gila trout (O. g. gilae). It natively lives in clear, cool streams in the White Mountains that flow through coniferous forests and marshes, but has been introduced into several lakes in the area. The Apache trout is native to the upper Salt River watershed (Black and White Rivers) and the upper Little Colorado River watershed. Apache trout have been introduced into isolated streams outside of their historic range in the Pinaleno Mountains, Mount Graham and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.
Life history


Dimensions Up to 18" (46 cm); 3 lbs (1.4 kg).


Endangered Status The Apache Trout is on the U.S. Endangered Species List. It is classified as threatened in Arizona. The Apache Trout was almost exterminated by exotic trouts that were introduced into its waterways. Rainbow Trout hybridized with it, and Rainbow, Bull, and Brown Trout competed with it for food and habitat and preyed on it. Changes to habitat, mainly the result of damming and other water-management practices, also took a toll. Recovery efforts are underway, including the renovation of habitat and reintroductions of the Apache Trout into waterways within its original range.


Habitat Rivers & streams.


Range The Apache trout is the state fish of Arizona, and is one of only two species of trout native to that state, with the other being the gila trout (O. g. gilae). It natively lives in clear, cool streams in the White Mountains that flow through coniferous forests and marshes, but has been introduced into several lakes in the area. The Apache trout is native to the upper Salt River watershed (Black and White Rivers) and the upper Little Colorado River watershed. Apache trout have been introduced into isolated streams outside of their historic range in the Pinaleno Mountains, Mount Graham and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.


Discussion Recovery and management efforts for Apache trout have been ongoing since the 1940s. Apache trout are raised in Federal and state hatcheries, and reared fish have been used to assist with recovery and to maintain populations for sport fishing in certain streams and reservoirs.


 

 

 

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